Getting started with the Creality CR-6 SE 3D printer

I noticed an uptick in interest for the Creality 6-SE 3D printer lately (either because the price is dropped a bit end of last year, or because people are buying second hand). Since I’ve had mine since it was initially released on kickstarter, I thought I’d add some useful insights and links for people getting started with one.

My current CR6-SE setup

First off: it’s capable of making really consistent quality and precise prints for an FDM printer. That being said, the initial design and QA felt a bit rushed, and even if the newer models being produced now have fixed all the initial issues, there are still a few small things you should definitely do to upgrade the printer. For all the things I mention here, there are plenty of videos and more detailed information out there, google them if you are unsure or want more details.

Printing small minis
Printer calibration test

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unboxing Checklist

Ok, so you have the printer in front of you and are new to all this. Have a look at the following checklist to get it set up and make sure everything is working as intended: https://gist.github.com/Sebazzz/030d21c606413e22cbd77d8df9fb8b17

Firmware

The official firmware is a bit lacking in features and doesn’t make full use of the Marlin firmware it is based off. There is a community maintained firmware version that is far superior and add a lot of functionality and fixes: https://github.com/CR6Community/Marlin/releases

The firmware updates both the main motherboard and the firmware for the display.

Motherboard

Bigtreetech has a drop in replacement motherboard that also fixes a lot of the issues with the initial Creality motherboard. I’m using this motherboard and have been more than happy with it.

Alternative Motherboard from Bigtreetech

Daughterboard (Hotend)

If your hotend daughterboard breaks, it can be hard to find a replacement. What is sometimes easier to find is a complete hotend assembly (e.g. on aliexpress, it has the whole hotend assembly, strain gauge, daughterboard, hotend with heater and thermistor, fans and backplate).

Full Hotend Assembly

My tips

  • Don’t tie the ribbon cable to the hotend (black) and the bowden tube (white, filament moves through it) together. The hotend is connected to the strain gauge (which is used for the automatic bed leveling and triggers at around 160g of pressure if calibrated correctly). Pulling/pushing on the bowden tube can influence the sensitivity of the automatic bed leveling. This also means that if you make any modifications to the hotend assembly (especially to fans, cover or duct), you might have to recalibrate the strain gauge (there is a small potentiometer on the daughterboard on the hotend, it’s super finicky to adjust, I suggest using a kitchen scale and the LED should light up blue at around 160g).
  • Before you print anything else, print this filimant guide thing:4677617 it snaps in place between the extruder and the runout sensor and makes it infinitely simpler to feed filament into the system. Trust me, it’s a quick print and will make handling filament so much easier.

    Filament guide between runout sensor and extruder
  • If you want a quieter printer, replace the motherboard and power fans. I use Noctua versions of the fans (will need a step down from 24V to 12V for the motherboard fan), but any quiet fan will do. You will want to print an alternate cover for the psu that has space for the larger fan: thing:4665448. Since the fans extend farther down than the original design, you should also add/print risers to the feet of the printer to lift everything a few centimeters.

    Printed covers for motherboard and power supply
  • If you plan on updating firmware more regularly, you might want to extend the sdcard externally (so you don’t have to take apart the display to get to the display board each time). Just get a simple/cheap extender off amazon, you can either bring the cable outside at the bottom of the board, or through the ventilation slots on the back.

    External sdcard access to update display firmware
  • The standard glas printing surface is OK. I’ve also had good experience using the Creality PEI magnetic bed (has a rougher surface) and a magnetic WhamBam surface for a smoother finish.

 

Another list on reddit of helpful things to know: So you just ordered your CR-6 SE…

This should be enough to get you started 🙂

Board game organizer for Andor Junior / Andor: The Family Fantasy Game

One thing I like to use my 3D printer for is improving board games. Especially when it comes to all the tokens and figures and whatnot, we like to use foam core and 3D printed elements to keep things better organized.
This is an insert I made for the kid’s version of Andor (it’s marketed under a few different names depending on the language, here in Germany it’s called “Andor Junior”, Board Game Geek lists it as “Andor: The Family Fantasy Game”).

The insert is the same height as the box (so you can also stand the box upright without everything falling out), and holds all the small tokens and dice.

Board game geek link: Andor: The Family Fantasy Game
Thingiverse link to the 3D files: thing:5337354

I used tinkercad to design this insert (which I use a lot for these kinds of things), for more technical designs I use the free version of Fusion 360.

Printing wood filament

I wanted to try printing a wood filament and picked up a roll of Easywood Pine from FormFutura. Wood filaments are a mixture of PLA and wood fibers or particles. I tried printing a few test objects, and from a printing perspective it prints very similar to normal PLA.

Due to the fibers in the filament I’d suggest a 0.6mm nozzle (or larger) to reduce the chance of clogging. And I also went with a steel nozzle from micro-swiss since the wood in the filament can be a bit abrasive and wanted a more durable nozzle.

Realistically, we are just printing plastic with wood fibers in it, nothing we print will ever be confused with real wood. That being said, it does have wood like characteristics, the surface and smell do have a slightly wood like quality to them. If I had to compare it to something, I’d say it reminds me most of thick rough cardboard.

Filament card Top

As far as print accuracy goes, It faired pretty well. some details were lost (most obvious in the last photo of this post), but that was to be expected both printing with a rough material and printing with a larger nozzle.

Viewed from the back we can see the underside of the bridging on the bottom right. The card was printed on a flat metal surface, the filament adheres very well to the build plate. I also tried out different build surfaces, even a rough one in the hopes it looked more wood-like. But the rougher surfaces all turned out shiny and looking very fake due to the plasticky rough surface.

Filament card Bottom

I printed the same card with ironing enabled on the top layer. The results were not good at all. The ironed parts are very uneven and the wood feeling of the surface is pretty much gone, the surface is non-uniformly rough, but not in a good way. It feels as if too much heat is transferred into the printed object and the plastic becomes very dominant. Having the filament heated up but flowing slowly through the nozzle can also “burn” the wood fibers and/or increase the chance of clogging.
There are probably situations where (localized) ironing my have beneficial results, but It’s not something I suggest having on by default.

Ironing

A final photo with a direct comparison between a 0.4mm nozzle printed PLA+ filament and the 0.6mm nozzle printed wood filament.
It’s not a filament I’d use every day, but I’m happy to have it here, and have a few ideas I’d like to try out with this filament.

“Wood” filament compared to PLA+ filament

Why filament cards are useful.

One thing I learned while printing 3D is that a lot depends on which printer you use, what and how you print, and what filamants you use. This blog entry is a “this is how I do it and what works for me, and why it works for me”, other people may have different opinions based on how/what they print and which filaments they use, and that is totally fine. If filament cards are something new to you or something you are interested in, I’m happy to share my experiences and knowledge here with you. Links to models in the pictures here are at the bottom of the blog post.

What is a filament card

A filament card (or color swatches, or whatever you want to call them) is basically just a small card. It’s design can range from a plain rectangle for color reference, or have features built into it like different layer depths, bridging and wall strengths. It can any shape, but rectangles are often used, but I’d suggest using the same shape/model for all cards.

 

Why are filament cards useful?

Printing filament cards when you get a new roll of filament is a habit I’d suggest getting into early. They allow you to easily reference or compare colors and printing results to chose the right filament for the job. They are also useful if you get samples from a product.
If you were ever trying to decide “which of these blues would look best for what I need to print” or “which of my filaments had the best bridging results”, then this is a system you will enjoy.

filament cards

 

Labeling

Some people creates cards for each specific filament, printing the name and settings (e.g. temperature) directly into or onto the card. While I find this neat, I wanted to avoid having to create a new card for each filament (since newer slicer versions may create different gcode and I’d be comparing not only filament A to filament B, but also different slicer results, and the name can be quite long depending on how much information I want to present). The upside to only having one STL/gcode for all cards is that is is easy to manage and compare results. The downside is that a) I need to label the cards in a different manner, and b) adjust the temperature settings for the filament on the printer.
For labeling I use a traditional label printer (as seen on the pictures), and document manufacturer and color of the filament (I only add the temperature if it is unusual). On the pictures above I put the label on the front, but on the latest cards I’ve printed I’ve started placing the label to the back since there is more space there (back surface quality is mostly dictated by the printer bed and less interesting), the front does a better job of showing the surface quality of the filament, and in the back the label doesnt interfere with the tray slots.

Card features

Comparing colors and the “feel” of the filament is what I use the cards mostly for, but I also chose a cards with a few extra “features” that come in handy. The cards I use are a little bit higher than what you normally see to give me more room for the label and more material to compare. On the top there are a few small tests (round ball, wall with hole, bridging, cylinder only supported on one end, slanted surface), the card isn’t uniformly square on the outside (some edges are rounded). On the top we have square corners, on the bottom round corners. The bottom part of the card starts off with an unsupported bridge, then slowly increasing card thickness (if you hold the card up against a light, you can see how translucent the card is at which thickness). Along the bottom edge ther is an overhang test, another thickness test with more gradients and a wall thickness test.

There are a variety of simpler and more complex cards out there, pick whatever is useful for you and what you print (or make your own).

 

filament card front
Front
filament card back
Back

Storage

Some people put their cards on zip ties or rings, some just collect them loosely. I like to put they cards in trays and sort by filament type and color. Trays come in all sorts and sizes, but should be high enough to keep the cards from falling out, and low enough to easily remove individual cards.

filament card tray

Where to get

Thingiverse has plenty of options if you search for “filament card”. I personally prefer customizable objects that I can tweak with OpenSCAD to my liking. I’d suggest saving the STL file and generating the gcode files once and using the same files for all filaments, since slicer software updates and changes over time, and you want to compare filaments and not slicer results. I have two files, for 0.4mm, and 0.6mm nozzles (since some filaments require a larger nozzle).

I can highly recommend the following card and card tray (these are the ones used in the pictures above):

Customizable filament cards: thingiverse 3346069
Customizable tray thingiverse 3595869