WiFi SSIDs on different VLANs

Taking a different direction here and trying out a more HowTo style post. I thought I’d do a quick write-up covering WiFi SSIDs on multiple VLANs, something that might be useful in a home setup, separating SSIDs better from one another. While I usually prefer the CLI, a lot of the devices mentioned here only (or mainly) use a web GUI for configuration management, so this posting will include a lot more screenshots than my usual postings. This posting won’t contain anything exciting for people who run and support networks professionally (mostly just a “so what options are available on SOHO hardware?”), and may even be overly simple and assume settings you wouldn’t do in a professional setup. But it is useful for homelab enthusiasts looking to build a more complex setup than “everything on the same VLAN/network” or trying to figure out “how do I use VLANs, give me an example”.

Ubiquiti and Netgear have some reasonable priced network gear that I’ve written about in the past that behave decent in home networks. For out little setup today we will have a WiFi access point with multiple SSIDs, two switches, and a firewall/router. We will be focusing on the configuration of the WiFi Access Point (UniFi AP) , the two Netgear switches (GS105Ev2 / GS108Ev3) and the Ubiquiti Router (Edgerouter X).

Our goal is to have two SSIDs on the access point, one for the “normal” devices (VLAN 1), and one for separate devices (VLAN 178). Since the router to VLAN 178 is on a different switch than the access point we also need to trunk both VLANs across the network. Another way of looking at it, is that we are expanding Subnet/VLAN 178 into our network (but limiting it to the WiFi Access points). 178 doesn’t hold any special meaning, you can use any VLAN number you want, just chose 178 because the subnet in this test setup was 10.0.178.0/24.

Here is a diagram of our test setup:

VLAN 1: The management and main client VLAN
VLAN 178: Subnet 178, 2nd WiFi network

Netgear 1

Port 1: Connection to Netgear 2
Port 5: Access Point

Netgear 2

Port 1: Connection to Netgear 1
Port 8: Edgerouter

Edgerouter

eth0: Connection to Subnet 178
eth1: Connection to Netgear 2

 

Wireless Configuration

In the UniFi controller go to Settings->Wireless Networks either create a new network or edit an existing one. If you go into the advanced options area, you will find the VLAN setting for that SSID. Activating the option and setting a value means the access point will tag all packets from that SSID to the specified VLAN number.

In the network overview below we see that packets from one network are tagged with VLAN 178, and packets from the other network are untagged (the switch configuration will take care of deciding which VLAN untagged packets are part of).

 

Netgear Configuration

The Netgear devices only have a VLAN 1 defined by default, so the first step will be to add VLAN 178 to both of them. Enable Advanced 802.1q (VLAN->802.1Q->Advanced->VLAN Configuration), enter the VLAN ID 178 in the box and click on “Add” at the top.

Now let’s move on to the VLAN Membership configuration. To switch settings, just click on the port and it will switch from tagged->untagged->none.

Netgear 1 device

For VLAN 1 we want port 1 to be (T)agged since it is the trunk to the next switch, and all other ports (U)ntagged since they will be dealing with untagged VLAN 1 traffic. The PVID will also be set to 1 for all ports.

For VLAN 178 we want port 1 to be (T)agged since it is the trunk to the next switch, port 5 (T)agged since it is the connection to the access point, and all other ports “none” since none of those ports are part of VLAN 178.

 

 

VLAN overview after changing all the settings:

 

For this scenario it is sane to leave the Port PVID configuration to PVID 1 on all ports. You could change a port to 178 if you are expecting untagged traffic on that port that needs to be in VLAN 178.

Netgear 2 device

Similar configuration as the first switch so I’ll skip the screenshots. Port 1 is the connection to the Netgear 1 device, port 8 is connected to the Edgerouter.

    • all ports PVID 1
    • VLAN 1 Tagged port 1 and 8, all other ports untagged
    • VLAN 178 Tagged port 1 and 8, all other ports none

 

Edgerouter Configuration:

Make sure the interface switch0 spans all ports you want to use VLANs on. Add the two VLANs 1 and 178. They should show up in the list as switch0.1 and switch0.178, and you can apply firewall rules to these interfaces to restrict traffic if you are doing any routing between the two networks.
We will want to tag everything from Subnet 178 as VLAN 178 on the interface connected to that network (eth0 in our setup), and allow VLAN 178 on the outgoing interface (eth1 in our setup). The Edgerouter doesn’t need us to specifically allow VLANs already set by the PVID, only additional VLANs need to be specified in the vid field.

 

Where to go from here?

You could put servers or virtual machines in their own subnet/VLAN and then use a firewall to restrict access between the different networks.

Adding more Access Points is straightforward, UniFi automatically applies the wireless configuration to all Access Points it manages, so all you need to do is take care of the switch port configuration.

Adding CVE information to Nmap scans

Last week I stumbled across a nice nmap script that adds CVE information from https://vulners.com/ to the results of nmap scans. Since it relies on version information from services it requires you scan the host with -sV

Example:  nmap -sV --script vulners host 

The github repository is https://github.com/vulnersCom/nmap-vulners/ 
You can add the script to your nmap installation with dir=/usr/share/nmap/scripts/ ; curl -ksL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/vulnersCom/nmap-vulners/master/vulners.nse >> ${dir}vulners.nse && chmod 0644 ${dir}vulners.nse 
(or wherever your nmap script directory is, e.g. /usr/local/share/nmap/scripts/ ).

OpenVAS: Using PostgreSQL instead of sqlite

When using OpenVAS in larger environments (e.g. lots of tasks and/or lots of slaves) you may have noticed the manager controlling all the slaves/scans can get sluggish or unresponsive at times. In my experience it is often due to the different processes waiting for an exclusive lock on the sqlite database. Fortunately OpenVAS 8 and above also supports using PostgreSQL as a database backend instead of sqlite. I think OpenVAS 7 also had support built-in, but it was still considered experimental.

Documentation on how to use PostgreSQL as the backend is in the OpenVAS svn repository. In a nutshell it is mainly adding -DBACKEND=POSTGRESQL to your cmake when you compile the manager (my cmake line is cmake -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX=/ -DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=Release -DBACKEND=POSTGRESQL ..). I generally only compile the master with PostgreSQL support and leave the slaves to use sqlite (since they don’t have as many concurrent accesses to their database). The documentation also steps you through the permissions you need to set up in PostgreSQL so it can be used by OpenVAS. Don’t forget to make the system aware of your OpenVAS libraries, in my case since I install OpenVAS to / I put /lib64/ in my /etc/ld.so.conf.d/openvas.conf file and then execute ldconfig.

One issue you may run into is migrating data from sqlite to PostgreSQL. There is a migration script in svn that can migrate the data, but it only works for a few older database versions. I assume OpenVAS 9 will contain an updated version of the script when it is released, but until then I wrote a script that uses the OMP protocol to export/store/import some of the settings. Since it only uses OMP to communicate with the master it is backend agnostic. You can use it to export the sqlite data and import it back into a manger using the PostgreSQL backend. It also means that it can only access data you can export via OMP (so no credential passwords/keys). The script will keep references intact (which tasks uses which target/schedule/…). The list of what it exactly imports/exports is on the github page: github.com/ryanschulze/openvas-tools

 

How to install the latest Nmap for Debian/Ubuntu

A quick & dirty script to download the latest version of nmap (sourcecode) and generate a deb and install it (so that it’s correctly in the package management). Yes, I know this is not much more than a glorified configure && make && checkinstall

Script to start minion in tmux

Minion is a security project from Mozilla (link). It provides a user-friendly web interface to various security scanner tools. There is a webcast demonstrating the software (link).

The software requires a few services to run, and since I like having one script take care of starting everything with the right parameters, I threw together a simple shell script that sets up a tmux session with the services started in windows with the names of the services.

Updated OSSEC Web UI 0.3 files for OSSEC 2.6

OSSEC is an open source HIDS (Host-based Intrusion Detection System), and a pretty darn good one too. It also has a simple web front-end to view what’s going on, search through alerts and stuff like that  (called OSSEC Web UI, I’ll just call it “WUI” here). Unfortunately the code is a bit outdated (the last official update was from 2008 as far as I can tell) and it doesn’t support newer features of OSSEC like polling data from a database. Something I’d like to tackle if I find the time 😉

The latest version of OSSEC is 2.6, and due to some small changes to the format of the logs WUI no longer works out-of-the-box. I had a look at the code this weekend and am providing patches and downloads of the files needed to change to get everything running again with OSSEC 2.6.

List of changes:

  • Works with the OSSEC 2.6 alert log file format
  • Changed Rule ID Link to better work with the new documentation wiki
  • Added “user” field to alert output
  • Widened the layout by a few pixels (to 1000px) and changed the CSS / alert layout to make the individual alerts better readable
  • Moved some of the hardcoded formatting to CSS

Download Download changed files
Download Patch download

 

Playing around with DD-WRT

I’m currently playing around with my two WL-330GE Access points from asus (see an older posting). Since that posting I was a bit creative using the existing ethernet cabling and ports in the apartment to be able to retire the WiFi bridge without having any cable going through the apartment.

So I decided to use the two access points for something more useful. I’m playing around with dd-wrt to build configurations to use them as WiFi probes (for an IDS), or as Rouge Access Points (for demonstration purposes and to test wireless IDS solutions).  I might compile my own dd-wrt version for the rouge version, there are a few things I miss to build a truly evil device.

I like the size of the devices (very compact) and that you can power them with 5V (you can run them off any USB port, right now the one here is hooked up to the USB port of a printer intended for cameras) the only thing missing to make them perfect would be Power-over-Ethernet and maybe a GSM interface to upload data online.

Fun having a cheap and small device like this with Wifi and ethernet running linux. Provides lots of possibilities and fun.

 

What plugins is that website running?

While having a look at nikito yesterday I stumbled accross cms-explorer. It’s an interesting little program that checks the themes/modules/plugins installed in common CMS systems (Drupal, WordPress, Joomla! and Mambo), with automatic exploration for Drupal and WordPress. It also has some nice bonus features like providing a list of known issues for plugins found by accessing the OSVDB.org database.

Example output:

Running it against my own webspace revealed a possible SQL injection I was unaware of. *) Fixed that, will probably replace that plugin completely this week, anything that has stuff so obviously bad in it is generally not all too sane.

*) I normally look at plugins before I install them, must have missed this one. @ PHP programmers: anyone who passes on the content of a $_REQUEST directly to a SQL query without any sanity checking deserves to be flogged with his own code.

Basic Server Hardening

Ok, here is a list of a few programs I’d advise anyone to use who is running a server on the internet (or thinking of doing so).

  • aide or tripwire (they can check and report if files on your system get changed, configurable levels). If you use tripwire, don’t forget a “tripwire –check -I” after you do any updates.
  • logcheck will check your system logs, and report anything out of the ordinary (“ordinary” is defined by a list of ‘normal’ rules, and anything you add)
  • tiger goes farther than logcheck, it actively checks your system and reports anything strange (files not belonging to packages, users or groups that got added, …)
  • grsecurity adds more security features to your kernel (at least use the basic features and the possibility to turn off module loading after boot)
  • rkhunter, chkrootkit scan the system for signs of rootkits or other malware. just install, make sure they are executed daily by cron, possibly tweak rkhunters config a bit (I had problems with unhide and current kernel versions)

I’m not saying that setting up and tweaking all this software and actually reading the emails they generate will make your server super-duper secure, but they will reduce the risk of running a server open to the internet and alarm you if somthing strange is happening. It is important to read and understand what theese programs mail you. Yes, you will get false positives from time to time. And yes, you will have to adjust the config now and then due to package updates; but I get about 3-4 mails a week, and that is definatly ok considering the amount of data that gets checked.